Collect data on threatened
carnivores in
Neuras

Cheetahs, leopards and hyenas

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  • Duration
    2-12 Weeks
  • Accompanied age
    12+
  • Minimum age
    18+
  • Start dates
    Every Thursday
  • From
    £946
  • Duration
    2-12 Weeks
  • Accompanied age
    12+
  • Minimum age
    18+
  • Start dates
    Every Thursday
  • From
    £946

Namibia carnivore conservation & research in Neuras

Want to be a part of conservation in Namibia? Well we cannot think of a better project to volunteer on! Assisting with data capture of native carnivores, you will help with the research on the conservation of carnivorous species such as cheetahs, leopards and hyenas in the stunning Namibia Desert.

You will play a vital role in collecting data on threatened carnivores, where you will be working daily with free-roaming big cats and other wildlife and actively contributing to their protection and conservation. All data collected is then used to help reduce human-wildlife conflict in the hopes of preventing further declines of these magnificent species.

"Make the most of the research sites- don’t leave Namibia without seeing Neuras! It always great being a part of this dedicated team as they work tirelessly on true conservation."

This incredibly diverse and breath-taking landscape is home to an array of amazing wildlife, such as cheetahs, leopards, hyenas, zebra, kudu, oryx, springbok, steenbok and ostrich.

You will take part in crucial conservation activities such as setting camera traps, game counts, capture mark release and GPS / radio telemetry tracking. You will be observing and monitoring carnivores and other animals in their natural habitat, adding invaluable knowledge to research which is used to help sustain these often-threatened species for future generations.

As part of the research volunteer programme you may have the opportunity to see a release or capture or take part in tracking the collared animals to check on their health in the wild. Since the programme began in 2008, staff and volunteers have combined their efforts to successfully rescue and release over 80 cheetahs, 30 leopards and 15 brown hyenas!

Carnivore numbers are starting to decline and several species are becoming endangered. The large majority of cheetahs and other animals live outside of protected conservation areas and often results in them being killed by farmers who view them as a threat to their livestock.

The focus of the project is to locate carnivores that local farmers think may be a problem and to then collar and track them to record vital data on their movements and kills. This data can then be supplied to the farmers to show that they are not a threat to their livestock, thus reducing the conflict between humans and animals as well as enabling them to stay in their natural environment.

This way of reducing human-animal conflict in the area is seen as one of the best opportunities to secure the future for the animals. Locals gain insight and a better understanding of them and become deterred from killing those that venture onto their property.

The tranquil seclusion and peacefulness of nature that the desert solitude provides allows you to get away from it all. Your day starts with the waking silence of the desert and ends with newfound friends sitting around the pizza oven looking up at the clear night sky.

Accommodation & meals

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Volunteer fees

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What's included

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